Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121230
SHOW
Book TV 14
Cavuto 8
Today 8
( more )
STATION
FBC 45
MSNBCW 44
CNNW 43
CSPAN 38
CSPAN2 24
CNBC 17
KPIX (CBS) 15
KQED (PBS) 15
WBAL (NBC) 13
KGO (ABC) 12
WMAR (ABC) 12
KRCB (PBS) 8
KTVU (FOX) 8
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 7
KQEH (PBS) 6
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 402
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 404 (some duplicates have been removed)
with your friends as well. we are all lucky to live in san francisco, because so many of our technology companies have located their headquarters here in san francisco. [cheers and applause] and because they're located here, we can always ask them for a favor here and there and make sure no one is left out, because that is what we do in government. david chiu and i come from backgrounds where we do not want to leave anybody behind. we want everybody to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i
. so, before the mobile phone only to technologies had spread as widely as the mobile phone. no technology has spread as rapidly as the mobile phone. the only other recent one was the transistor radio and before that, it was fired to spread as wildly. so, what is the -- we know what it means in our lives and what smart phones been and all that but what does it mean for the majority of the world's population. it was built highways, communication highways and labor never connected before. in afghanistan we talk about story that you asked about entrepreneurs and was responsible for creating the afghan cell phone company. this is the biggest story in afghanistan and the last ten years. we don't hear about it. why? because the fact that more afghans today have access and know how to read or write, when a decade ago they would have had to walk 700 miles to make a phone call. but that's not a story. what is a story? it is a big story. i would imagine it is something that means a lot to them in terms of their key devotees. but what is even more exciting, you think about when we buil
to you empty spaces but beware. that technology isn't perfect. cornell is live in san francisco. >> there are 29,000 parking spaces in san francisco. 7000 of them are smart like these equipment technology to help smart phone app signal where empty parking spaces are but doesn't always work finding parking in san francisco. can be a mission impossible. >> drive around for like half hour sometimes. easily. >>reporter: san francisco is one city in the bay area using smart parking technology which adiscuss praises and meters and senses determine if a space is vacant. parking app use the information to help you find the nearest space. officials admit only 90 percent accurate. >> anything as far as using new technology can't be absolutely perfect but what we have done is to look at this ongoing basis and make tweak when we can. >>reporter: we down loaded the free park app including empty spaces on haight street near franklin. 6 minutes later we were there but only found a very crowded street. this time it appears the app let us down. not a single space here on haight street a
the container royalty fund. it was established in the 1960s to help dockworkers displaced by technology, the port alliance says these days those royalties serve as a bonus to workers, not a safety net. but the union disagrees saying the payments still help compensate workers for lost job opportunities. florida is home to almost a third of the ports that would be affected by the potential strike, governor rick scott says he's still thinks a deal will be reached, but if it doesn't he's counting on washington to step in. allison worrell, "n.b.r.," fort lauderdale, florida. >> susie: volatility was the word of the day here on wall street. investors were fixated on the war of words in washington over the fiscal cliff, and shrugged off some encouraging news today about jobs. fewer americans filed for jobless benefits last week: new claims fell 12,000 to 350,000. but the labor department says the christmas holiday may have distorted the numbers, as some state offices were closed monday and tuesday and could not provide data. in the markets, the volatility index, or what's often called the "fea
are the big challenges year, what are the things different now? from a technology perspective, this is pretty easy. i can tell you that if we were to do this today, you would say, i cannot believe you were using lte phones and 4g, as i am using 6g. joining us is a director for cisco systems business solution group, which is a global strategy and consulting arm. prior to that, he was president and ceo of government's strategy is of a leading market research firm from 2001 to 2003 heading the industry advisory council, a founding member of a council, and he spent 28 years in the federal government, including being the first cio at the department of commerce, and he is also a winner. doug bourgeois is the chief for vmware. prior to that, he was the director of national business center at interior, where he provided business management services government wide like the ones we talked about he had several roles at fedex. he has also hosted the vmware's i.t. challenge. it airs in the washington, d.c., market. mark forman is the first official c.i.o., president and co-founder of government transacti
disappointing data. well, technology shares under pressure, especially the large cap names. the selling could be due to uncertainty on a budget deal and folks just wanting to lock in gains, potentially, of course, before taxes on capital gains go up next year. maybe not such a surprise. check out the spider select technology fund, an etf, exposure to the likes of, yes, app 8, and soft -- apple, and software makers and stocks. xlk, the name, and it's dropping. apple, of course, look at what apple's doing, down today, about 1%, but it is up 27% this year. google moving higher. microsoft and ebay lower today, especially ebay down, well, nearly a buck today on the trade. all right, so about, oh, about 47 minutes left of trading on the day after christmas. the markets still trying to get back to the water mark. they are now down about six points after briefly getting above in positive territory. tech stocks the worst. case index showing home prices on the rise, a good thing. check in on how this moves the markets, if at all, nicole's on the new york stock exchange, and jeff flock at the cme. nicol
's legacy. how are you, sir? >> good morning. >> i'm interested in how technology can revive the dream. let's talk about post partisan ways to use technology to change a lot of the problems we have. >> let's talk about that. everybody agrees that only growth can give us the american dream again and balance the budget. >> how? >> the key to any successful economy in the world today is to have widespread broadband, lots of that internet you were just talking about and very, very cheep and clean energy. if we can move the economy very, very rapidly to cheep and clean energy and to very widespread broadband, we will have the platform on which rapid economic growth will be possible. >> you made the me think about a guest we had a couple of weeks ago. ray was brilliant and talked a lot about the singularity and the future where man and machine and technology will be much more merged than we are now. technology will allow it to do things that are unimaginable at this point. do you foresee that future where technology becomes part of the body and allows it to go to another level. >> the most exciti
and technology? >> it's a good question, and it's one that comes up all the time. and i think the important thing to recognize is, you know, people -- when the airplane came along, okay, the framers had no idea there would be air travel like that. probably except for jefferson. [laughter] but he wasn't around when they were writing the constitution. so does that mean that the commerce clause doesn't apply to air travel? of course not. the principles that the framers meant to establish in the commerce clause certainly can readily be applied to evolving commerce. the court doesn't always get this right. i mean, for example, when wiretaps first came up, you know, when the framers wrote the fourth amendment about searches and seizures, they didn't envisions wiretaps, and the first decision was, well, the fourth amendment momentum apply o this. but it became pretty clear pretty quickly that allowing people to intercept private conversations constituted the same sort of search and seizure of material that the framers want to protect. so you try to find, at least i do -- different judges approach these
to do. >> how reliable is the internet on satellite these days? >> minimally. it is a technology that is the last resort for the internet. if there is no possibility of a physical connection -- there are fewer places in the world who do not have redundant physical connections. most remarkably, that is africa. they have seen six new cables down the coast where previously there was only one cable down the west coast. as much as possible, people are fromer to move away satellite because of the high costs and because what is known as latency, the time delay in making that trip. >> these centers in hudson, l ondon, ashford, when it comes to cybersecurity, would these be prime targets? >> no, i do not think they would be. i take cybersecurity very seriously, but i think the far greater concern is a threat through the network and not the physical threat of infrastructure itself. these buildings are well secured. these buildings operate redundantly with each other. say google and comcast having interconnecting networks. unit set up in los angeles and los angeles -- you would set up in lo
and there are parking app that can guide to you empty spaces but beware. that technology isn't perfect. cornell is live in san francisco. >> there are 29,000 parking spaces in san francisco. 7000 of them are smart like these equipment technology to help smart phone app signal where empty parking spaces are but doesn't always work finding parking in san francisco. can be a mission impossible. >> drive around for like half hour sometimes. easily. >>reporter: san francisco is one city in the bay area using smart parking technology which adiscuss praises and meters and senses determine if a space is vacant. parking app use the information to help you find the nearest space. officials admit only 90 percent accurate. >> anything as far as using new technology can't be absolutely perfect but what we have done is to look at this ongoing basis and make tweak when we can. >>reporter: we down loaded the free park app including empty spaces on haight street near franklin. 6 minutes later we were there but only found a very crowded street. this time it appears the app let us down. not a single spac
:an exploration of reverse engineering of the brain. the national medal of technology recipient attempts to determine how the brain works and apply the knowledge to the creation of intelligent michelin's. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,achines . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, ingrid wickelgren. >> this is a fascinating book and it is great to be with you. my first question is to try to talk about the main thesis of the book. are you saying that we can basically reverse engineer the human brain, that it is feasible to do that to creates computer mind that is in distinguishable from yours and mine? >> it is feasible. the level of complexity we can handle, i actually describe the basic principles of the neocortex in the book. some people say and i articulate this criticism in the book and respond to it that every one of the hundreds of trillions of connections was placed exactly
, the source of all of our technology and ultimately our military power and potential for growth and we are ttling into over the pale, everybody in silicon view is angling for green subsidies and it is a tragedy. lou: that tragedy compounded by the fact the money that has been spent by this administration if you will on venture money like solyndra has been disastrous. >> they are twisting our venture capitalist, turning people like john doerr into a blithering idiot. john seeking government subsidies. he now wants us to support him rather than him to support the country with wonderful new companies like intel. lou: john is being adaptive to new realities. the primary source of the capital, he is turning to it, i suppose. i want to turn to this book, "the israel test." you take up the issue of the world civilization, importance of israel within it. as capitalist as well as jewish state. you really believe that israel is that strong, that important in the world's future? >> i certainly do. the american economy is heavily dependent on israel today, partly because of the debauchery of silic
for the suggestion. we have about 25 minutes left. we'll come back and talk with jason pontin of the "mit technology review." the subject is about solving big problems in america. we'll take your calls in a moment. [video clip] >> the british admirals and generals were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and it's clear the colonists were pulling together the ammunition and cannons. the king basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the collins found out about the order in new hampshire and rhode island, they took the ammunition so everybody knew it was coming in the winter of 77 for-1775 -- in the winter of 1774-1775. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are focusing on the "mit technology review." we are talking about big problems in the world. we will get to this coverage in just a second. this is ja
vegetable it is. being stuck in a wheelchair to being able to walk again. new technology that is called a medical miracle. check in with kelly wright to see what's coming up on "fox & friends." >> good morning heather and heather. we are following the latest on the fiscal cliff negotiations. there's a big white house meeting going on today. but the white house says it's not open to negotiation. so we will tell you about that. also coming up on the show special drink to make this new year's eve and the skwlooifrng cure for the after all coming up top of the hour. see you then. i did in the last five hours? i played a round of golf. then i read a book while teaching myself how to play guitar; ran ten miles while knitting myself a sweater; jumped out of a plane. finally, i became a ping pong master while recording my debut album. how you ask? with 5-hour energy. i get hours of energy now -- no crash later. wait to see the next five hours. like say, gas station sushi. cheap is good. and sushi, good. but cheap sushi, not so good. it's like that super-low rate on not enough car insurance. pre
of economy and entrepreneurship and high-technology industries. gerri: so what if we compare favorably with a lot of developed countries out there -- what would be the practical effect? >> it will slow the flow of venture capital and investment for high-technology companies. if you think about every mjor high-tech company like apple or microsoft or ebay or amazon, they were all nurtured by high income people putting money in early on to these startup companies. we dramatically cut the capital gains tax rate from 40% to 20% before, so what we are going to do is kill america's entrepreneurial economy. gerri: let's get into the details of this. why you would want to keep these capital gains taxes low. you say it is an issue of double taxation. >> that's right. corporate profits are taxed at the corporate level. and they are taxed again at the individual level. with the dividend and catal gains taxes. george bush, to his credit, tried to do something about that and he chopped the dividend and capital gains tax down to 15%. the effect of that was to reduce the incentive for corporations to
that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our technology leaders, the people who really inspired me, they were inspired by these wonderful things happening. i'm going to focus on a little period of time. as short as four years, maybe six or seven. it is that time that orville wright and his brother took off. the world realized -- they did not do that with photoshop. since that first flight, the people who had taken a flight could sit in that first wrote and only three of you would have taken a turn. we did not even have the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the move
to the experience of a woman like maria montessori. the third principle is innovation and technology. when i say italy everybody will think of the arts and music. they don't think of technology yet we want to persuade you there are lots of things to be discovered. i was working in the world of energy and there i think we have taken enormous steps in the direction of a modern sustainable green economy, what we call now distributed generations of people producing and consuming energy. this is happening at an incredible pace in california and i know california like this is and we want to connect with california. some of the events will require the supports of the leaders that are here present, the leaders of the italian american associations. i am very proud to say that all of the leaders of the italian american associations are gathered today, mr. mayor, and senator assembly man and board of supervisors is here to celebrate with us and ramona blackwell who with the committee of the italians abroad and elected body and we will need your support and it's not just top down but bottom up. we're
eye on 2016. okay, when we come back, from energy to education, to technology. our panel's pick for the good news story of the year. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> well, just when you thought there wasn't that much to cheer
all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human side of nasa as well. i would not subscribe to that kind of recommendation. >> lower the emphasis a bit. >> making a distinction between science and exploration, nasa is more than just a science agency, it is an exploration agency, a tool of u.s. farm policy. just looking at sites as defined in the service, it is realistic for. the reason why you do human in part is for exploring the unknown, but putting people in an unusual or alien situation. you learn things you would not learn if he stayed at home. there is a wonderful example looking at someone -- and viruses and how they become changed in space. this means there is a gene sequencing issue. if we can figure out how to control but, we could have a potential vaccine for salmonella. that is not the thing that would emerge into a ground based laboratory. it emerges might put people in a very different environment to go into the unknown. human space flight is probably the m
, harry reid, to craft a deal. >> a new ultrasound tool could last blood clots in lungs. >> technology is blamed for the lack of fitness but a company is looking to use the device is to encourage athleticism. >> christmas is over and it is time for the post-holiday sales. >> a discovery getting back to biblical times is under arrest near jerusalem. there were also several sacred vessels. the finds are rare. pope benedict xvi called on catholics to fearlessly support their faith. the pontiff delivered his prayer before a crowd gathered in st. peter's square. he spoke of the first christian murartyrs. the pontiff also expressed support and encouragement of all christians to suffer persecution. nearly 40% of people who suffer from pulmonary embolism face major problems. embolism causes heart to work harder which could lead to heart failure. the usual treatment would be clot-busting madison called = = called tpa. >> it delivers the medications for the catheter but it also has ultrasound energy that helps loosen up the clot and allows the tpa to work faster and more effectively. >> ecos is
at a letter sense out today by committee of science, space and technology, they are talking about a man in department of energy, running the loan gar abty program who was using private e-mail accounts and office of science and technology, technology officer there conducting business with a private e-mail account, how widespread do you believe this is? >> you have to say how many places is this the being used. and there is no doubt that people are trying to use it to avoid compliance with the freedom of information act. that is absolutely unacceptable. we have to find out how widespreaddis it. how many accounts are being used. different accounts traps a number -- perhaps a number of accounts by the same person, we have to assure this is not being used to avoid compliance with the law, transparency is for important not only to us but to american citizens this is not done, that is something we're not going to let go of until we get to the bottom of it. tom. i hope not, people said why are people not held accountable for their actions? are -- forgive me, i do not know the procedure or theel
are in companies investing in. >> when i was a corporate analyst in india tracking markets, technology was considered the engine of growth for the country and one of the bright spots for the market. is technology still one of the areas you are tell clients to invest in in india, or what are the sectors you're looking at? >> i think there's two sectors whether you look at india, china, or asia. there's two sectors we like. it's technology, as you said. i think that's one that -- it's a bright gem. you know, it went from, in india, from a bpo outsourcing business and has grown to an innovation business where brands are being developed and real technological gains are being had. the other sector we like is health care. the demand for health care in these markets is just continuing to grow steadily. obviously people are having longer lives, having more disposable income for health care and treatment. and so those are two sectors we really like. >> okay. and curious, as an emerging market investor, how closely are you watching the fiscal cliff negotiations here in the u.s., the debt crisis
that galvanized indians. >> our kids were going to be whoever they were going to be. >> but technology can help couples pick the sex of their child. the consequences and the concerns even here in the bay area. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, southern california: a womad a girl died after a car plowed into a bus benchn riverside. thi >>> developing introduce out of southern california. a woman and a girl died after a car plowed into a bus bench in riverside. this afternoon's crash also injured two others. it's unclear what caused the car to mount the sidewalk. >>> highway 1 near big sur is back open tonight. caltrans closed that road sunday after a rockslide. this week an emergency contractor cleared it and fixed the road and stabilized the hillside. the highway reopened to two-way traffic about an hour ago. >>> you don't have to pay to ride on muni tonight. the transit agency is offering free rides to celebrate its 100th birthday. buses, the underground, cable cars are all free. you can still hop on no charge until 5:00 tomorrow morning. >>> big fans. '60s. '70s and '80s the dmv has something new for you. cbs
. at the same time, the nature of military conflict is changing. because of the new technologies like cyber and proliferation of missiles, we are seeing potential adversaries, state and non state actors alike acquire more advanced, hybrid and high- end capabilities designed to frustrate the conventional advantages of our armed forces. this means the military services must remain vigilant and strong and appeared to . to operate in a way that differs significantly from the past. we will continue to face terrorism and deadly attacks by ied's, but we must also be ready for more capable adversaries to attack our forces and homeland in cyberspace. to attack and launch precision strikes against forward bases, to attempt to cripple our power grid, our financial systems, our government systems. to attempt to deny us freedom of action isometric attacks. as i said, the goals of our new defense strategy is to help shape the force of the 21st century. try to adapt our forces and operating concept said that we are better prepared for an unpredictable and dangerous future. we have been determined to avoid
into the early 21st century, the confidence has given way to doubt. technologically newer forms of travel especially airplanes and rocket-propelled capsules provide the sense of extreme danger that had faded during the relatively safer nineteentnineteent h century. equally, it's now clear that imperialism had smoothed the way from early circumnavigate is under political and social conditions that would be unwise and unjust to perpetuate let alone re-create. above all there is a growing sense of the planet as beginning to fight back or shrug us off. that that was environment the cost of planetary dominatiodominatio n that had begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel, every emerging fear that the planet could simply shrugged this off, continuing confidence if we might be able to generate technology and political alliances to dominate the planet but doubt that it is always wise to dominate it in that way. is especially apparent that the characteristic confidence of the long 19th century was the shortest of planetary experiences. yet it has been the most d
market equation whether they want to go dig deeper, wider, with over the situation is. and the technology of copper mining is getting better so they can - 312 in bisbee. it gets bad but they knew had to do it in a way that saves them money so it is a constant cycle of boom and bust boom and it is even more pronounced if you go to the mining towns meaning the company towns. and in arizona we have company towns. it's rare to find a company in the united states anymore where they have everything, schools, the bar, hotels, the supermarket, the barbershop so every single person in the town is paid by the line. that is true in the biggest one in the united states is in arizona. it's a company town. and it's a very depressing place to go. maybe about 700,000 tons of copper a year so its huge. i don't know if you noticed the design, but they did a great job. any of your questions? what's that? >> [inaudible] >> yeah, exactly. that's right. so, any other questions? >> i find it really fascinating what you said about the fact they just don't know how to control the fact that they are polluting. do
war and it's particularly true of the navy is it six kind of on a technological point in american history things had been changing for some time. the power comes in and the railroads already expanding across the continent but the application of the large-scale warfare in the civil war is one of the first cases where we see that. now the land war probably arguably at least is the most immediate impact was the shoulder muskett which dramatically extended their range the soldiers could fight and at sea there are a number of similarly important technological changes. obviously there is steam that had been around for a generation or more with the application, the universal both on the blockade and those attempting to run the blockade rifled guns just as muskets in the field armies and the artillery extended their range and accuracy thereby hiding elevating the impact of the war ships over the guns ashore going into the civil war. the general motion was turned guns ashore are going to defeat them afloat every time mainly because they don't sink. but with the new rifle ordinance and expl
with the brand new electronics you just unwrapped. our technology editor is here with how to get the best use out of all that gear. >> knowing me, when i open one of those, i'm the first to scratch it, drop it, break it. >>> first, we want to get to some of this news. major damage after strong storms swept through the gulf states. at least three people have died, dozens more are injured from texas to georgia. >> and the news could be getting worse. that storm is moving east with strong winds and snow. winter watches and warnings are posted in 21 states, from texas all the way to maine, including blizzard warnings in seven of those states. our coverage begins with abc's brad wheelis. >> oh, my god, look, that's a tornado. >> reporter: this twister slammed into downtown mobile, alabama, injuring several people. vast swaths of this city were suddenly dark, leaving 17,000 homes and businesses without power. emergency crews blocked roads to better assess the damage, while the rain continued to pour on the city. >> oh, jesus, look at that tornado. >> reporter: another of the more than a dozen tornadoes
be watching and maybe putting money up against? here to tell us is technology reporter natalie morris. welcome back. you had a little baby since the last time, ava. congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> nice christmas, i'm sure. let's start with what you see as a possibility in the phone space next year. >> okay. so i'm seeing a lot of rumors about something called branded phones. so facebook, amazon, now google, mozilla, having whisperings about their own phone which may be a little confusing for consumers but these are phones that are highly branded with these services and that you will be able to get to the services anywhere you are. you can facebook anything -- >> instead of motorola, i will have a private label amazon phone that's going to help me get to amazon and its services quickly, facebook and its quickly. but will they run on droid or microsoft's platform? >> that's the question. there are rumors that mozilla will do their own operating system but a lot of these will probably use some version of android. >> let's talk about microsoft which is always in the news. the surface,
has two missions. to maintain the technological superiority of the u.s. military and prevent technological surprises from harming national security. the life science pros jects are rooted in military needs like meeting the threat of microbes or treating brain injury in the battlefield but they promise to transform civilian medicine. darpa specializes in high reward research. many of its projects sound like science fiction. when completed isu
? and a technology suite with bluetooth, navigation and other handy stuff? yeahthat would be cool. introducing the all-new nissan sentra. it's our most innovative sentra ever. nissan. innovation that excites. now get a $169-per-month lease on a 2013 nissan sentra. ♪ on a 2013 nissan sentra. let'for an idea.s - a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like lerty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people believe in the american idea and when they do, the dream comes true. we're grateful to be a part of it. clusters of pustules, pimples. i had this shingle rash right next to my spine. the soreness was excruciating. it was impossible to even thi about dancing. when you're dancing, your partner is holding you. so, his hand would have b
years, is the idea that technological advancement might replace some workers. we don't have big heavy guys throwing a box on to a ship like you see in the 1940's movie. they're containerized ships using cranes and they're concerned that further technological advances will replace some people that right now, according to the waterfront commission, about a third of the new york workers make north of $210,000 a year without is special bonuses that come on later. 34 made north of $350,000 a year last year and they're worried about being replaced by machinery and -- for the most expensive port in the world. >> eric: thank you to brett. thank you, sir. >> thank you. >>> is this port strike happen, should unions face a backlash? we contacted the international longshoreman's association again, still no word. we tried it yesterday. we have 64,000 longshoreman to may hold up 50 or 60% of the nation's import and export trade. >> it's worse. when you throw in another looming fiscal calamity. you're damaging the economy at the time it's already suffering damage. >> is what the unions do? think abo
to amputation and traumatic brain injuries forced the medical field an technology to evolve and how the technology is now serving the newly injured war fighter. peck has had 29 surgeries in 2.5 years. >> can't keep up. >> now he lives on a wooded patch of land with his mom lisa in rural virginia. two weeks ago, independence fund gave john a new lease on life and chance to do something that standard wheelchair can't do. head outside and offroad. in to the forest where many of the warriors grew up hunting and fishing. peck drives something known as track chair, new technology developed bay cuple in minnesota that allows the wheelchair to function like all-terrain vehicle. >> i used to ride atvs. i guess i would consider this a tank. >> 27-year-old john peck looks like a boy given his first bmx bike for christmas. >> whee! my darkest fears? was my divorce. >> his young wife left him. >> she couldn't hang with the injuries. she wanted to move forward for me being 6-foot tall and having muscles and everything like that. once i got injured she hung it up. i was a very angry and spiteful p
to the end of 2012, what are the hot trends for the new year? we will look at everything from technology to toys. [ bells dinging ] ♪ hark how the bells, sweet silver bells ♪ ♪ all seem to say throw care away ♪ ♪ from everywhere, filling the air ♪ [ female announcer ] chex party mix. easy 15-minute homemade recipes you just pop in a microwave. like caramel chocolate drizzles. happier holidays. chex party mix. >>> we can't predict the future. josh levs can. we can make some educated guesses but what's ahead in 2013 but josh levs, our chief everything correspondent, is here to tell us what to expect in everything from business to travel to food. josh? >> better than yesterday when you declared me the chief apocalypse correspondent. it's all good. what do we know about what's coming up ahead in the next year? let's start with this >> the world of business and your money, you can expect a continued rebound in housing in 2013. according to our cnn money team. record low mortgage rates and drop in foreclosure led to a rise in prices. cnn senior reporter chris isidore says that will
with somebody. okay. technology is changing leaps and bounds. what happens when you have tvs that can start looking back at you as well? >> a little creepy. we can assure you, we are not doing that right now. >> meanwhile, if you are looking outside, you have to notice something. there's a big storm moving through the bay area. >> let's check in with elizabeth for the first look at the weather forecast this half hour. >> thanks, guys. a big shopping day for a lot of folks. this is what you are getting hit with right now. a lot of rain falling all over the bay area. high def doppler picking it up in the north bay, the south bay, and each day. we will zoom on in for the northbay. there is a heavier cell moving over santa rosa and parts of the state as well. looks like it's picking up among the penance love. we got heavier downpours. no late rain falling over san jose as well. it will taper off after the afternoon gets underway. it is going to end by this evening. for right now it is wet and windy. we have a wind advisory in effect from the north and east to a. until about 1:00 this afternoon
they're in any danger. this volcano last erupted in september. >> new technology is boosting u.s. oil production. we'll take you to a boomtown flush with cash. that story is next. me#> >> glor: with just a few days to go, 2012 will likely set a record high for gas prices. a.a.a. says the average was $3.61 a gallon nationwide this year. that is ten cents more than in 2011. that surge in prices came even though oil production is booming in this country. the u.s. is forecast to overtake saudi arabia as the world's largest oil producer by 2020. ben tracy visited one of america's new boomtowns. >> reporter: in the middle of a colorado cornfield, sandwiched between cattle and farmhouses, is the front line of an american oil boom. >> we plan to invest over $8 billion over the next five years here, so we're extremely excited. >> reporter: mike dickinson works for noble energy, which is doubling its production in weld county. this oil field stretches from colorado into wyoming. in 2008, it produced 83,000 barrels of oil, yet this year it is expected to reach nearly ten million barrels. how dif
by technology. the maritime alliance wants the royalties capped. earlier this month a port strike in southern california, cost an estimated $1 billion a day. netflix is blaming problems at its web service provider, amazon for a server outage that took down its streaming video service on christmas eve and into christmas day. netflix says it worked through the night with engineers at amazon to get the service back up and running. netflix shares rebounded today, rising almost 2%, while amazon shares fell nearly 4%. >> susie: amazon was just one of many stocks in the red today. as we mentioned earlier, stocks were dragged lower by the retail sector after a report showed consumers did not go all out this holiday shopping season. that sent shares of some of the nation's largest retailers lower. macy's fell 1%. upscale retailers coach and saks were hardest hit. walmart and best buy were also modestly lower. volume improved a bit from monday but was still light with many traders still on vacation. no surprise, consumer related stocks were some of the weakest performers in today trading. consumer disc
says it positions its agents where they are most effective, and that increased manpower and technology have dramatically reduced illegal border crossings. >> yes, there is traffic out on those ranch lands. communities continue to be impacted to a certain extent. but you can't discount the fact that the gains that have been made over the course of the last few years. >> reporter: but the ranchers see it differently. >> the border is not secure. the border is worse than it's ever been. >> reporter: they're most afraid when the sun goes down, and their land comes alive with mexican smugglers headed north. mark potter, nbc news, arizona. >> and there's late word tonight of a huge settlement involving toyota and lawsuits related to claims of sudden acceleration in some of its cars. the settlement is worth up to $1.4 billion. some of the money will go to owners who said they sold their cars at reduced prices because of bad publicity over those claims of sudden acceleration. a lawyer for the plaintiffs called it the largest settlement involving auto defects in u.s. history. >>> and coming up
with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth. something unpleasant but -- and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 404 (some duplicates have been removed)